Friday, April 1, 2016

The Sad Truth! Moments of truth and reflections

The Sad Truth! Moments of truth and reflections 


What your are about to see... candidly is the sad truth about the current and historical facts that brought us here. This is not a theory, it is hard truths...about my life, The White House, President Obama, and more...proceed with caution, what you are bout to see is truly real!
video

theory examples to follow below and to include
Examples Word Origin
See more synonyms on Thesaurus.com
noun, plural theories.
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Keywords:
Sad Truth, Moments, reflection, Kurt Kelly (Celebrity), Live Video Inc (company), Politics, The White House, Secret Service, FBI, President Obama,

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theory according tohttp://www.dictionary.com/browse/theory
[thee-uh-ree, theer-ee]
Spell  Syllables
Examples Word Origin
See more synonyms on Thesaurus.com
noun, plural theories.
1.
a coherent group of tested general propositions, commonly regarded as correct, that can be used as principles of explanation and prediction for a class of phenomena:
Einstein's theory of relativity.
Synonyms: principle, law, doctrine.
2.
a proposed explanation whose status is still conjectural and subject to experimentation, in contrast to well-established propositions that are regarded as reporting matters of actual fact.
Synonyms: idea, notion hypothesis, postulate.
Antonyms: practice, verification, corroboration, substantiation.
3.
Mathematics. a body of principles, theorems, or the like, belonging to one subject:
number theory.
4.
the branch of a science or art that deals with its principles or methods, as distinguished from its practice:
music theory.
5.
a particular conception or view of something to be done or of the method of doing it; a system of rules or principles:
conflicting theories of how children best learn to read.
6.
contemplation or speculation:
the theory that there is life on other planets.
7.
guess or conjecture:
My theory is that he never stops to think words have consequences.
Idioms
8.
in theory, ideally; hypothetically:
In theory, mapping the human genome may lead to thousands of cures.
Origin of theory Expand
Late LatinGreek
1590-16001590-1600; < Late Latin theōria < Greek theōría a viewing, contemplating, equivalent to theōr (eîn) to view + -ia -y3
Can be confused Expand
hypothesis, law, theory (see synonym study at the current entry)
Synonym Study Expand
1, 2. In technical or scientific use, Theory, principle, and law represent established, evidence-based explanations accounting for currently known facts or phenomena or for historically verified experience: the theory of relativity, the germ theory of disease, the law of supply and demand, the principle of conservation of energy.Often the word law is used in reference to scientific facts that can be reduced to a mathematical formula: Newton's laws of motion.In these contexts the terms theory and law often appear in well-established, fixed phrases and are not interchangeable. In both technical and nontechnical contexts, theory can also be synonymous with hypothesis, a conjecture put forth as a possible explanation of phenomena or relations, serving as a basis for thoughtful discussion and subsequent collection of data or engagement in scientific experimentation in order to rule out alternative explanations and reach the truth. In these contexts of early speculation, the words theory and hypothesis are often substitutable for one another: Remember, this idea is only a theory/hypothesis; Pasteur's experiments helped prove the theory/hypothesis that germs cause disease.Obviously, certain theories that start out as hypothetical eventually receive enough supportive data and scientific findings to become established, verified explanations. Although they retain the term theory in their names, they have evolved from mere conjecture to scientifically accepted fact.

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
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Examples from the Web for theory Expand
Contemporary Examples
Donna Dawson, a psychologist and relationship expert, supported Peacock's theory.

A New Survey Suggests Chivalry May Not Be Dead...It's Just Women Who Are Doing It
Erin Cunningham
December 22, 2013
Do we engage more casually with our lives, on the theory that any experience can be reduplicated later?

How We Lost Our Memory
Casey Schwartz
March 1, 2011
In theory, the Islands were part of the land given to Argentina by Spain upon independence in 1816.

The Never-Ending Falklands War: In Buenos Aires, A Museum's Selective History
Michael Luongo
August 29, 2014
In theory, it is possible to move or protect these assets, but doing so will be neither quick nor cheap.

The End of the Arctic? Ocean Could be Ice Free by 2015
Mark Hertsgaard
December 12, 2013
But that leaves us with a big question about the Oakley theory.

The Iraq War Caused Many Bad Things, But Did It Really Cause the Financial Crisis?
Megan McArdle
March 31, 2013
Historical Examples
It is a theory which is not yet developed into an experience.

Italy, the Magic Land
Lilian Whiting
"No theory at all," said the colonel, but corrected himself.

Jack O' Judgment
Edgar Wallace
Let us see how such a theory works, say, in the School laboratory.

The Lighter Side of School Life
Ian Hay
A theory which he had formed was destroyed by that recollection.

Jack O' Judgment
Edgar Wallace
It was possibly in anticipation of his theory that the young effigy called him "father!"

Materialized Apparitions
Edward Augustus Brackett

British Dictionary definitions for theory Expand
theory
/ˈθɪərɪ/
noun (pl) -ries
1.
a system of rules, procedures, and assumptions used to produce a result
2.
abstract knowledge or reasoning
3.
a speculative or conjectural view or idea: I have a theory about that
4.
an ideal or hypothetical situation (esp in the phrase in theory)
5.
a set of hypotheses related by logical or mathematical arguments to explain and predict a wide variety of connected phenomena in general terms: the theory of relativity
6.
a nontechnical name for hypothesis (sense 1)
Word Origin
C16: from Late Latin theōria, from Greek: a sight, from theōrein to gaze upon

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for theory Expand
n.
1590s, "conception, mental scheme," from Late Latin theoria (Jerome), from Greek theoria "contemplation, speculation, a looking at, things looked at," from theorein "to consider, speculate, look at," from theoros "spectator," from thea "a view" + horan "to see" (see warrant (n.)). Sense of "principles or methods of a science or art (rather than its practice)" is first recorded 1610s. That of "an explanation based on observation and reasoning" is from 1630s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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theory in Medicine Expand
theory the·o·ry (thē'ə-rē, thēr'ē)
n.

A systematically organized body of knowledge applicable in a relatively wide variety of circumstances, especially a system of assumptions, accepted principles, and rules of procedure devised to analyze, predict, or otherwise explain the nature or behavior of a specified set of phenomena.

Abstract reasoning; speculation.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Cite This Source
theory in Science Expand
theory    (thē'ə-rē, thîr'ē)  
A set of statements or principles devised to explain a group of facts or phenomena. Most theories that are accepted by scientists have been repeatedly tested by experiments and can be used to make predictions about natural phenomena. See Note at hypothesis.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
Cite This Source
theory in Culture Expand
theory definition

In science, an explanation or model that covers a substantial group of occurrences in nature and has been confirmed by a substantial number of experiments and observations. A theory is more general and better verified than a hypothesis. ( See Big Bang theory, evolution, and relativity.)

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Cite This Source
theory in Technology Expand

The consensus, idea, plan, story, or set of rules that is currently being used to inform a behaviour. This usage is a generalisation and (deliberate) abuse of the technical meaning. "What's the theory on fixing this TECO loss?" "What's the theory on dinner tonight?" ("Chinatown, I guess.") "What's the current theory on letting lusers on during the day?" "The theory behind this change is to fix the following well-known screw...."
(1994-12-14)

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Add these citations to your bibliography. Select the text below and then copy and paste it into your document.
American Psychological Association (APA):
theory. (n.d.). Dictionary.com Unabridged. Retrieved April 01, 2016 from Dictionary.com website http://www.dictionary.com/browse/theory
Chicago Manual Style (CMS):
theory. Dictionary.com. Dictionary.com Unabridged. Random House, Inc. http://www.dictionary.com/browse/theory (accessed: April 01, 2016).
Modern Language Association (MLA):
"theory". Dictionary.com Unabridged. Random House, Inc. 01 Apr. 2016. <Dictionary.com http://www.dictionary.com/browse/theory>.
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE):
Dictionary.com "theory," in Dictionary.com Unabridged. Source location: Random House, Inc. http://www.dictionary.com/browse/theory. Available: http://www.dictionary.com/. Accessed: April 01, 2016.
BibTeX Bibliography Style (BibTeX)
@article {Dictionary.com2016,
    title = {Dictionary.com Unabridged},
    month = {Apr},
    day = {01},
    year = {2016},
    url = {http://www.dictionary.com/browse/theory},
}

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